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LOUPS Pub Social - From Social Cognition to Social Robots (and back again!)

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19th November 2020, 9pm, LOUPS Online Pub
LOUPS Social Event
Price£0.01
Online booking has now closed, please contact london@oups.org.uk for availability.
Description

A talk by Professor Emily Cross.

Talk begins at 9pm for an hour, followed by Q&A.

We want to make this event open to as many people as possible, so you do not have to pay anything. However if you would like to contribute we would appreciate a donation of £5.

All profits from this event will be donated directly to Mind (www.mind.org.uk), the UK-based charity who provide advice and support to empower anyone experiencing a mental health problem, and who campaign to improve services, raise awareness and promote understanding of mental health issues.

How to join the event

You can buy this event just like any other OUPS event.

  • We will then send you several reminder emails as the event approaches, each containing a personalised link. You can click on any of these to join the event.
  • Once you have bought this event, you can also find your link to join the session right here, along with any event materials. You will just need to log into the website and come back to this page shortly before the event.

Description

"Why do we at one time perceive a robot as merely an automaton, while at other times as an engaging social being? Can we understand the anger of a robot? To what extent do brain regions mediating social interaction with humans also support interactions with our mechanical friends? Could social robots provide entertainment, emotional support, and companionship to support independent living, and reduce the workload of healthcare professionals ?"

These and other questions are typical research topics within the field of Social Robotics, and LOUPS are delighted to welcome Professor Emily Cross, co-director of the Social Brain in Action Laboratory (www.soba-lab.com), and Principal Investigator of the ERC-funded Social Robots project (www.so-bots.com) to present on the work within her teams.

Understanding how we perceive and interact with others is a core challenge of social cognition research. This challenge is poised to intensify in importance as the ubiquity of artificial intelligence and the presence of humanoid robots in society grows. My group’s research applies established theories and methods from psychology and neuroscience to questions concerning how people perceive, interact, and form relationships with robots.

In this talk, I review recent evidence from behavioural and brain imaging studies that aim to provide deeper insights into the relationship between social cognition and brain function. Examples from work comparing social perception of humans compared to robots highlights the importance of examining how perception of and interaction with artificial agents in a social world is revealing fundamental insights about human social cognition.

Speaker

Emily Cross

 

Emily holds positions as a Professor of Human Neuroscience (Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia), and Professor of Social Robotics (University of Glasgow, Scotland).

Through her research, she uses brain imaging techniques, robots, performing arts and artists, and action training paradigms to explore how experience-dependent plasticity, action expertise, and aesthetic preferences are manifest across brain and behaviour.

 

 

 

Costs

All profits from this event will be donated to Mind (www.mind.org.uk), the UK-based charity who provide advice and support to empower anyone experiencing a mental health problem, and who campaign to improve services, raise awareness and promote understanding.

We would appreciate a donation of £5, but to make the event open to as many people as possible you can choose the price you would like to pay.

The LOUPS Online Pub holds a maximum of 150 people.

This social event combines the comfort of your own home with a research-based talk in a cutting-edge area. 

Cost includes a glass of whatever drink you would like to bring with you !

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